Our Top 20 Best Books of All Time

With so little time to read numerous books, how can we avoid reading bad books and find a good few books to read that “should be chewed and digested thoroughly?” We believe any book from our top 20 best books of all time is worth reading to anyone at any time.

Whatever the breathless claims about reading, one thing is certain: losing yourself in a great book is one of life’s most enduring and dependable joys. Job satisfaction comes and goes, partners enrapture and abscond, but you’ll always fall back on the timeless ability of a book to move you to a special world.

Books do something unique. They simultaneously speak to the heart and mind. They teach you about the history of the world, the possibilities of the future, and the fabric of the souls.

Writing a list of the top 20 best books of all time ever written

How we arrived at our list

When creating this list, we didn’t solely rely on books we have read and found interesting, nor is this list mathematically scientific. We took into account the number of ratings, recommendations, and voting by famous authors of all time.

Not seeing some highly-rated books you think should be here? Chances are it likely didn’t have enough ratings, was not recommended by readers or no famous author voted it. Whether you are looking for great books to add to your reading list or share with others, you will enjoy this list of the top twenty best books of all time, as voted by famous authors.

Our list of Best Books of all Time

1. Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

This book is made of stories from a South African Childhood. It’s an autobiographical comedy book written by the South African comedian Trevor Noah, published in 2016.

The book details Trevor Noah growing up in his native South Africa during the apartheid era. As the mixed-race son of a black mother and white father, Noah himself was classified as a “coloured” in accordance to the apartheid system of racial classification. According to Noah, he stated that even under apartheid, he felt trouble fitting in because it was a crime “for him to be born as a mixed-race baby”, hence the title of his book.